What #MooreandMe meant to moi

Here’s the best summary, and you can read the whole story at Tiger Beatdown, so I’m not going to recap…if you’re interested, you know already, and if you’re not, you probably have lots of sand in your ears from when your head was underground…

But what it meant to me was a wave of feminist activism crashing through my computer – shouting to be heard, making incisive, sarcastic, witty, intelligent, argumentative points, engaging and challenging me.

I’m not an Olbermann fan (and I’m not allowed to be a follower, holla #WeveBeenKOed!), I’m much less of a Moore fan since he laughed off rape allegations because “how could two non-famous-document-leaker-women not be lying?!?!” and I honestly do not give two left shoes about Wikileaks…. but I am a sexual assault survivor. Seeing/hearing/reading the #MooreandMe protestors, men and women alike, demanding that my experience and the experience of every survivor be treated with respect… It meant a lot.

Even if the dialogue hadn’t spiraled into a v. strange, disfunctional volley, I know it was hard for a lot of people to make the leap from “Assange is accused of rape but he’s only being prosecuted because of Wikileaks” to “Olberman and Moore are rape apologists” but it’s been laid out here (the chronological facts) and here (the philosophical crux).

Not engaging with #MooreandMe, not reading through at LEAST those last two blog posts, not wrapping your mind around the annoying fact that not enough rapes are reported or prosecuted or result in a successful, healthy recovery for the survivor is a luxury of detachment. It is a privilege “not to care.”

#MooreandMe was an epic, assertive dismissal of privilege and an insistent call for those who claim leadership of the progressive movement to also claim solidarity with progressive feminists and the values we hold essential.

It was a demand to be heard and it felt good just to hear it. As we all tweeted and retweeted and favorited and riffed on KO’s middle school jabs, we began to find eachother. If some of my followers unfollowed under the onslaught, they were quickly replaced by feminists I hadn’t been following but clearly should have internet-met sooner, and that is awesome. We’re not alone, y’all.

[ETA: I forgot to mention how much gratitude I feel towards Sady and everyone else who put their energies behind keeping #MooreandMe going – it wasn’t easy, and a lot of people threw a lot of mud to get her/them/us to stop, so THANK YOU, Sady. I hope you’re enjoying some well deserved time away from the front lines]

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2 Responses to What #MooreandMe meant to moi

  1. Brigid Keely says:

    “Not engaging with #MooreandMe, not reading through at LEAST those last two blog posts, not wrapping your mind around the annoying fact that not enough rapes are reported or prosecuted or result in a successful, healthy recovery for the survivor is a luxury of detachment. It is a privilege “not to care.””

    Yeah. Being able to walk away from injustice without fearing that it will follow you home/affect you is a huge load of privilege.

    Thanks for posting this. xoxo

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